Organization Day 1949

1949-Organization day-Football Game

🇺🇸 ORGANIZATION DAY 🇺🇸
Below are photos from the 1949 Organization Day activities from 70 years ago. This was just a year after the Regiment was reactivated at Fort Myer and Fort McNair as a ceremonial unit.

In 1920, the Regiment selected the anniversary of Monterrey to serve as Organization Day to remember the fierce fighting and the men lost during the Monterrey campaign.

On the 21 September 1846, the 3rd Infantry, 262 men strong, was part of the first wave to attack Monterrey. Enemy artillery was stationed at street intersections, and the narrow streets were bounded on each side with buildings filled with infantry. In penetrating the first line of defense of the walled city, the Regiment found itself drawn into a situation in which the limited space to maneuver made it difficult for American units to support each other.

The losses that ensued reflect the nature of the combat. Over forty enlisted men were casualties; five officers, including the three senior officers, were killed and five wounded. The unit took its objective and held its ground until a lack of ammunition made withdrawal a necessity. The Regiment remained under Mexican artillery fire during the night and into the morning, when the city fell to the American army. The bitter house-to-house defense of the city by the Mexican troops made it the most costly single day in the history of the 3rd Infantry until Gettysburg.

The Regiment entered the battle with six companies and an effective strength of 14 officers, 40 non-commissioned officers, 7 musicians and 201 privates for a total of 262 officers and men. Losses totaled 52 (20%): 6 Officers KIA or DOW, 1 Officer WIA, 15 NCOs and Privates KIA or DOW, 29 NCOs and Privates WIA, 1 Musician WIA. Included among the officers killed were the Regimental Field Commander and the Regimental Adjutant.

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#FlashbackFriday – SOA Collection

Photo of the production staff from the 2013 Spirit of America season. Photo taken by Richard Olsenius and given to a member of the Regiment when she left the Army.

Let’s take a big look at Spirit of America with this #FlashbackFriday. Below is a link to all our uploaded Spirit of America items. Click the image to see all the albums.

Let us know in the comments what year(s) you participated in Spirit of America!

#FlashbackFriday – Spirit of America 1971

1971-11-12-14-Inaugural Spirit of America program-01

During the month of September, #FlashbackFriday will feature past Spirit of America seasons. Today we go back to the beginning of Spirit of America with the 1971 inaugural performance.

It was not only the first season of Spirit of America, but the first performance to be held in the Norfolk (VA) SCOPE Coliseum. Performances were presented November 12-14. The Saturday and Sunday performances saw television personalities Steve Allen and Soupy Sales serve as masters of ceremonies.

See the entire 1971 Spirit of America program here:www.flickr.com/photos/oldguardmuseum/albums/72157657454548535

FlashbackFriday – 1964 World’s Fair

1964-Worlds Fair-US Army Drill Team-2

Time for another #FlashbackFriday. The 1964-1965 World’s Fair has served as the backdrop and inspiration for various movies. In the 1997 movie “Men in Black” the observation towers were revealed to be alien spaceships. In the 2010 movie “Iron Man 2” the World’s Fair serves as the inspiration for the Stark Expo.

In June 1964, members of The Old Guard presented “The Flag Story” and a performance by the U.S. Army Drill Team as part of the “Salute to the Army.”

Flashback Friday – CCG & TUSAB 1951

This week’s #FlashbackFriday is from a 1951 Pentagon ceremony. Two key things to notice are the early uniforms of the Continental Color Guard and the bright yellow uniforms of the U.S. Army Band.

The color guard uniforms feature black wigs, buff facings (instead of the current red) and cocked hats with gold edging. The U.S. Army Band uniform, nicknamed the “Lion Tamer” uniform, was worn briefly in the early 1950s.